Thursday, September 25, 2014

This week we're celebrating..


Thank you to VikLit for starting this group where we celebrate big things and small ones. Please stop by www.VikLit.blogspot.com to check it out.
This week we're celebrating...

  • Our son Brendan's birthday. He's an awesome son and we're so blessed to be his parents.
  • Brendan's safe return from his business trip.
  • The first day of Fall-It's a pretty season for sure
  • More progress on illustrations and editing for our new book.
I hope you all have a wonderful weekend. Thanks for visiting.

Website:www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com
Latest interview: http://www.newstimes.com/local/article/New-Fairfield-author-shows-kids-anything-is-5753568.php

Thursday, September 18, 2014

This week we're celebrating...


Every Friday we celebrate things that happen during the week. Here's what we're cheering about this week:

  • My newspaper interview/ article was published last weekend. If you'd like to read it, here's the link: http://www.newstimes.com/local/article/New-Fairfield-author-shows-kids-anything-is-5753568.php
  •  We're having very nice sunny weather. The leaves are just starting to turn colors.
  • Our older son, Brendan, arrived safely at his destination to start the company trip. He should be returning tomorrow.
  • My husband is going to a car event in VT this weekend. He loves those things.
Wishing you a wonderful weekend. Thank you so much for stopping by.
Special thanks to VikLit for starting this group.
Website: www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com


Sunday, September 14, 2014

Newspaper interview Article



Deanie Humphrys-Dunne has written four children's books. She focuses on stories promoting positive messages for children, and often features animals, especially horses. She lives in New Fairfield with her husband, Francis. They have two sons and a dog, Elliot, who has been featured in some of her books.
Q: Horses feature prominently in your stories. Why is that?
A: I grew up on a horse farm called Sweetbrier. Now it's called Lion Hill Farm. My dad decided to teach me how to ride horses, and that changed everything for me. I think it's a good way to get my ideas across to the reader. Most children really like animals.
Q: When did you start writing, and why?
A: I took two courses in Redding in the 1990s. It was 1995 and 1996, I studied with the Institute for Children's Literature. After I graduated, I wrote a little bit. It wasn't until 2009 when I wrote my first book. I decided I really wanted to make a difference for children. "Tails of Sweetbrier" won a Feathered Quill award and is a finalist in the CLIPPA awards. The winner will be announced Oct. 1.
The reason I started writing was that I really want to be a role model for children. Anything is possible if you persevere. "Tails of Sweetbrier" shows the truth of this. My dad made a decision that changed my life. It shows anything is possible if you never give up.
Q: What happened?
A: I had a disability, and a doctor said I wouldn't be able to learn how to walk. My dad picked me up, carried me out and said, "Don't listen to him." When I wanted to learn how to ride horses and jump like my sisters did, he was concerned, but I said, "You teach blind people to ride. It's not fair if you don't teach me." He said, "You can do anything you want, but this will take a little bit longer."
Dad always told us we couldn't give up once we started something. This really was a good thing. Just refuse to give up. You could be really close to your goal and if you give up, you won't get there.
If I gave up, I never would have known horses, learned to ride or learned to walk. It's just what I believe.
Q: Which of your books are fiction and which are non-fiction?
A: All of my books are fiction except for my first, "Tails of Sweetbrier."
Q: Are all your books based on your life experiences?
A: Not exactly. The fiction books are told from the animals' point of view and are very funny. Each has a life lesson.
In "Charlie the Horse," he's unfocused, unsure about things, he has to learn to set goals. In "Charlene the Star," she's supposed to be a racehorse, but she has other ideas. She has to find a way to show her trainer that she doesn't like being a racehorse. It's okay to have different talents than your friends.
In "Charlene the Star and Hattie's Heroes," the animals work together setting goals and accomplish a lot of things. Charlene the Star decides to start a new business as a coach for horses.
Q: Your sister, Holly Humphrys-Bajaj, does the illustrations for your books. How has that worked out?
A: My sister is very gifted. The illustrations help my stories come to life. I'd have to do stick figures if it weren't for her. She designs the covers, too.
Q: You are also an award-winning blogger. When did you start blogging? Where can people find your blog?
A: I started blogging two years ago. I have a website that specializes in real children's true stories of inspiration, www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com.
Q: Are you working on a new book now?
A: Yes, Holly is working on the illustrations now. It has some of the same characters from "Charlene the Star and Hattie's Heroes." Hattie the chicken is in the new book. Her chicken friends are very depressed, so they decide to put on a talent show. Charlene the Star is trying to become Horse of the Year, and there's a little romance.
Deanie Dumphrys-Dunne's books are available on Amazon. A free chapter of one of her books may be downloaded from www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com. Visit her blog athttp://dhdunne.blogspot.com/.
cmueller@newstimes.com; 203-731-3338; http://twitter.com/CarolynMNT/
copyright Deanie Humphrys-Dunne 2014
information from Danbury News Times interview.
Deanie Humphrys-Dunne has written four children's books. She focuses on stories promoting positive messages for children, and often features animals, especially horses. She lives in New Fairfield with her husband, Francis. They have two sons and a dog, Elliot, who has been featured in some of her books.
Q: Horses feature prominently in your stories. Why is that?
A: I grew up on a horse farm called Sweetbrier. Now it's called Lion Hill Farm. My dad decided to teach me how to ride horses, and that changed everything for me. I think it's a good way to get my ideas across to the reader. Most children really like animals.
Q: When did you start writing, and why?
A: I took two courses in Redding in the 1990s. It was 1995 and 1996, I studied with the Institute for Children's Literature. After I graduated, I wrote a little bit. It wasn't until 2009 when I wrote my first book. I decided I really wanted to make a difference for children. "Tails of Sweetbrier" won a Feathered Quill award and is a finalist in the CLIPPA awards. The winner will be announced Oct. 1.
The reason I started writing was that I really want to be a role model for children. Anything is possible if you persevere. "Tails of Sweetbrier" shows the truth of this. My dad made a decision that changed my life. It shows anything is possible if you never give up.
Q: What happened?
A: I had a disability, and a doctor said I wouldn't be able to learn how to walk. My dad picked me up, carried me out and said, "Don't listen to him." When I wanted to learn how to ride horses and jump like my sisters did, he was concerned, but I said, "You teach blind people to ride. It's not fair if you don't teach me." He said, "You can do anything you want, but this will take a little bit longer."
Dad always told us we couldn't give up once we started something. This really was a good thing. Just refuse to give up. You could be really close to your goal and if you give up, you won't get there.
If I gave up, I never would have known horses, learned to ride or learned to walk. It's just what I believe.
Q: Which of your books are fiction and which are non-fiction?
A: All of my books are fiction except for my first, "Tails of Sweetbrier."
Q: Are all your books based on your life experiences?
A: Not exactly. The fiction books are told from the animals' point of view and are very funny. Each has a life lesson.
In "Charlie the Horse," he's unfocused, unsure about things, he has to learn to set goals. In "Charlene the Star," she's supposed to be a racehorse, but she has other ideas. She has to find a way to show her trainer that she doesn't like being a racehorse. It's okay to have different talents than your friends.
In "Charlene the Star and Hattie's Heroes," the animals work together setting goals and accomplish a lot of things. Charlene the Star decides to start a new business as a coach for horses.
Q: Your sister, Holly Humphrys-Bajaj, does the illustrations for your books. How has that worked out?
A: My sister is very gifted. The illustrations help my stories come to life. I'd have to do stick figures if it weren't for her. She designs the covers, too.
Q: You are also an award-winning blogger. When did you start blogging? Where can people find your blog?
A: I started blogging two years ago. I have a website that specializes in real children's true stories of inspiration, www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com.
Q: Are you working on a new book now?
A: Yes, Holly is working on the illustrations now. It has some of the same characters from "Charlene the Star and Hattie's Heroes." Hattie the chicken is in the new book. Her chicken friends are very depressed, so they decide to put on a talent show. Charlene the Star is trying to become Horse of the Year, and there's a little romance.
Deanie Dumphrys-Dunne's books are available on Amazon. A free chapter of one of her books may be downloaded from www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com. Visit her blog athttp://dhdunne.blogspot.com/.
cmueller@newstimes.com; 203-731-3338; http://twitter.com/CarolynMNT/

Friday, September 12, 2014

This week we're celebrating....


As you may know on Fridays we celebrate big things and little things. This week we're cheering about these things:

  • I had an interview with a reporter for one of the better known local newspapers. It's being published in the Sunday Chat section of the Danbury News Times. We're so excited about it.
  • Tomorrow is a book signing. If you're in the area of 1734 Huntington Turnpike, Trumbull, CT I'd love to meet you at the Trinity Episcopal Church Fair.
  • We'll celebrate all of you who stop by to read my blog every week. I appreciate you and wihs you many blessings. Happy weekend and thanks for visiting.
copyright Deanie Humphrys-Dunne 2014
website: www. childrensbookswithlifelessons.com.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

In Honor of Sept. 11, 2001

Remembering September 11th

In honor of the heroes we lost on September 11, 2001. May we never forget the events of that tragic day. We pray that God watches over "The land of the brave and the home of the free."

copyright Deanie Humphrys-Dunne 2014

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Role Models: Character is key for everyone


Role models: Character is key for everyone
By Deanie Humphrys-Dunne


As the author of four children’s books I love to create stories which entertain while promoting good values and character. How would you define character? Some might define character as “the way a person thinks, feels and behaves.” I believe it’s a “moral and ethical quality” that is part of a person’s nature. I think character is a special part of your personality that guides you toward making the proper choices. In my humble opinion character is sadly lacking in today’s society. It could be because single parents are not able to instill the proper values in their children. They may not realize it’s a top priority, as it could have been missing in their own upbringing.
 We’ll start with humility which I would say is a modest feeling of one’s importance. Another way to explain humility would be a natural meekness. If you are an arrogant self-absorbed person you are completely consumed with your own worth. Have you tried to conduct a conversation with such a person? It’s completely boring hearing about nothing but himself/herself. More importantly, how can you make a positive difference for others when you’re only interested in yourself? It would seem you’d be a dreadful role model. In my view, regardless of your accomplishments, there is always more to learn and ways to improve. If you keep an attitude open to change, you’ll learn and grow tremendously as an individual.
     Now we’ll explore determination as a very important character trait. If you are a determined person I believe you persevere through the difficult situations. You have dreams and goals that you pursue, even when they seem too big to reach. When I was a little girl I wasn’t walking at the usual age, so my parents began taking me to various doctors. When I was four years old one specialist declared that I would never walk. My Dad was infuriated that someone would think he had the power to decide such a thing! He picked me up and stormed out of the office. My Dad told me not to pay attention to what the doctor said. My Dad said, “Just because he said that, it doesn’t mean he’s right.” My Dad made a decision that changed my life, proving the doctor was wrong. If my Dad had listened to that doctor, I never would have realized my dream. When things are difficult, remember that you have the power to change many circumstances. Perseverance is the key to success.
Finally, we’ll talk about integrity. In my house we were taught to be honest in any situation. We had to uphold the truth. In order to illustrate my point, I’ll tell you the story of an event that happened when I was very small. My Dad had decided I could enter an event called the grooming class in a horse show. It didn’t involve riding. All I needed to do was walk a big white horse named Laddie into the ring. The judge would examine every detail of his appearance. He would check if Laddie’s coat was shining. He would see if his hooves were polished. He would check to be sure Laddie’s mane and tail were free from tangles and perfectly clean. While walking slowly around Laddie, the judge made notes on his pad. Finally he asked, “Did you groom him all by yourself, honey?” I answered, “No, my Daddy helped me.” I was thrilled with my blue ribbon, even though everyone else got one too.
 I left the ring, and Daddy said, “You probably would’ve gotten a special prize if you had told the judge you groomed Laddie yourself.”
          “But Daddy, it wouldn’t be the truth,” I answered.  He smiled and gave me a big hug because he knew I had made the right choice.
          I can tell you without reservation that the directors of the Claire Power Murphy Foundation stand for good character and values. We’re working together to help make the world a better place for everyone. We want to be good role models. How about you?
http://www.cpmfoundation.net/page14.html
copyright 2014: Deanie Humphrys-Dunne

Thursday, September 4, 2014

This week we're celebrating...

As most of you know on Fridays we celebrate big things and little ones that happened during the week.  Be sure to stop by VikLit.blogspot.com. Thanks for starting this group.
Here's what we're celebrating...

  • A night out with my husband tomorrow
  • A phone interview for one of the local newspapers-I hope we're going to still be celebrating this after it happens since I won't know the questions. D
  • I found a mistake in my new book that would have caused some confusion if it went undetected. Really grateful for this.
  • My sister, Holly, has been working on the illustrations for our new book. We're on track to have it out before Christmas, which was our goal.
Wishing yo all a wonderful weekend. Thanks for stopping by.

Copyright 2014 Deanie Humphrys-Dunne
Website: www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com.